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CLIMATE:
The Appalachian Mountains are the coolest area of the state, with daytime temperatures averaging in the low 40's and upper 30's for highs in the winter and often falling into the teens (−9 °C) or lower in winter nights. Relatively cool summers have temperatures rarely rising above 80 °F (26.7 °C). Snowfall in the mountains is usually 14–20 in (36–51 cm) per year, but it is often greater in the higher elevations. For example, during the Blizzard of 1993 more than 50 inches (130 cm) of snow fell on Mount Mitchell.

ABOUT THE SMOKEY MOUNTAIN
Up here in Haywood County, North Carolina, each day begins with a breathtaking sunrise and another chance to take in the mystical views and stunning landscapes. Once you catch your breath, get ready for an incredible day of exhilarating mountaintop adventures.
Filled with handcrafted artwork and culinary delights, uncover cultural treasures in Waynesville's charming downtown shops. Wind your way through 46 miles of the Blue Ridge Parkway. See elk and other wildlife in Cataloochee Valley, Ride horses, ski and snowboard in Maggie Valley. Play a round on one of our majestic golf courses, or just sit back and enjoy a deep breath of fresh mountain air.

So, come visit Maggie Valley, Waynesville, Canton and Clyde, where the sun rises on the Smokies, and enjoy a mountain getaway that will put a smile on your soul!


 

Population Density:
Image:North Carolina population map.png
 
Demographics of North Carolina
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 75.27% 22.20% 1.65% 1.70% 0.11%
2000 (Hispanic only) 4.28% 0.33% 0.10% 0.05% 0.03%
2005 (total population) 74.95% 22.29% 1.65% 2.06% 0.12%
2005 (Hispanic only) 5.89% 0.37% 0.12% 0.05% 0.03%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 7.41% 8.31% 7.51% 30.62% 17.92%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 4.93% 8.13% 6.31% 30.71% 16.84%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 48.62% 20.36% 25.79% 27.15% 21.63%

* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

ECONOMY:
According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the state's 2006 total gross state product was $375 billion.[35] Its 2005 per capita personal income was $31,029, 36th in the nation.[36] North Carolina's agricultural outputs include poultry and eggs, tobacco, hogs, milk, nursery stock, cattle, sweet potatoes, and soybeans.

Charlotte, North Carolina's largest city, continues to experience rapid growth, in large part due to the banking & finance industry. Charlotte is now the second largest banking center in the United States (after New York), and is home to Bank of America and Wachovia. The Charlotte metro area is also home to 5 other Fortune 500 companies.

BB&T (Branch Banking & Trust), one of America's largest banks, was founded in Wilson, NC in 1872. Today, BB&T is headquartered out of Winston-Salem, NC and still does some operations in Wilson.

EDUCATION:
Elementary and secondary public schools are overseen by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, which is headed by the North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction, who is also secretary of the North Carolina State Board of Education. This body holds most of the legal authority for making public education policy.[54] North Carolina has 115 public school systems,[55] each of which is overseen by a local school board. A county may have one or more systems within it. The largest school systems in North Carolina are the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Wake County Public School System, Guilford County Schools, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, and Cumberland County Schools. In total there are 2,338 public schools in the state, including 93 charter schools.

In 1795, North Carolina opened the first public university in the United States - the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. More than 200 years later, the University of North Carolina system encompasses 16 public universities including the five largest, North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and East Carolina University, UNC-Charlotte, and Appalachian State University. The system also supports several well-known historically black colleges and universities such as North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina Central University, and Winston-Salem State University. Along with its public universities, North Carolina has 58 public community colleges in its community college system.

North Carolina's private universities and colleges include Campbell University, Davidson College, Duke University, Elon University, Gardner-Webb University, High Point University,and Wake Forest University.

RECREATION:
Due to geography, rich history, and growing industry, North Carolina provides a large range of recreational activities from swimming at the beach[56] to skiing in the mountains. North Carolina offers fall colors, freshwater and saltwater fishing, hunting, birdwatching, agritourism, ATV trails, ballooning, rock climbing, biking, hiking, skiing, boating and sailing, camping, canoeing, caving (spelunking), gardens, and arboretums. North Carolina has theme parks, aquariums, zoos, museums, historic sites, lighthouses, elegant theaters, concert halls, and fine dining.[57]

North Carolinians enjoy outdoor recreation utilizing numerous local bike paths, 34 state parks, and 14 national parks, including:

FAMOUS FOOD & DRINKS
A nationally-famous cuisine from North Carolina is pork barbecue. However, there are strong regional differences and rivalries over the sauces and method of preparation used in making the barbecue. Eastern North Carolina pork barbecue uses a vinegar-based sauce and the "whole hog" is cooked, thus using both white and dark meat. The "capital" of eastern Carolina barbecue is usually considered to be the town of Wilson, near Raleigh. Western North Carolina pork barbecue uses a ketchup-based sauce and only the pork shoulder (dark meat) is used. The "capital" of western Carolina barbecue is usually considered to be the town of Lexington, south of Winston-Salem. A third type of pork barbecue, using a sauce which is a combination of ketchup and vinegar, is "Shelby" barbecue which is made in the town of Shelby.

North Carolina is the birthplace of Pepsi-Cola, first produced in 1890 in New Bern. Regional soft drinks created and still based in the state are Sundrop and Cheerwine. Krispy Kreme, a popular chain of doughnut stores, was started in North Carolina; the company's headquarters are in Winston-Salem. Despite its name, the hotsauce Texas Pete was created in North Carolina; its headquarters are also in Winston-Salem. The Hardees fast-food chain was started in Greenville. Another fast-food chain, Bojangles', was started in Charlotte, and has its corporate headquarters there. A popular North Carolina restaurant chain is Golden Corral. Started in 1973, the chain was founded in Fayetteville.

STATE SYMBOLS:
State motto: Esse quam videri ("To be, rather than to seem") (1893)
State song: "The Old North State" (1927)
State flower: Dogwood (1941)
State bird: Cardinal (1943)
State colors: the red and blue of the N.C. and U.S. flags (1945)
State toast: The Tar Heel Toast (1957)
State tree: Pine (1963)
State shell: Scotch bonnet (1965)
State mammal: Eastern Grey Squirrel (1969)
State salt water fish: Red Drum (also known as the Channel bass) (1971)
State insect: European honey bee (1973)
State gemstone: Emerald (1973)
State reptile: Eastern Box Turtle (1979)
State rock: Granite (1979)
State beverage: Milk (1987)
State historical boat: Shad boat (1987)
State language: English (1987)
State dog: Plott Hound (1989)
State military academy: Oak Ridge Military Academy (1991)
State tartan: Carolina tartan (1991)[59]
State vegetable: Sweet potato (1995)
State red berry: Strawberry (2001)
State blue berry: Blueberry (2001)
State fruit: Scuppernong grape (2001)
State wildflower: Carolina Lily (2003)
State Christmas tree: Fraser Fir (2005)
State carnivorous plant: Venus Flytrap (2005)
State folk dance: Clogging (2005)
State popular dance: Shag (2005)
State freshwater trout: Southern Appalachian Brook Trout (2005)
State birthplace of traditional pottery: the Seagrove area (2005)